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Setup: 5 Minutes
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Picture of ST
posted
Here's how we get our four piece band setup with the Bose systems in under 5 minutes (from the point that all the gear is on the stage). I thought I had posted this here but couldn't find it. Sorry if it's a duplicate.

I start with the PowerStand a couple of feet from the back of the stage (if necessary for "elbow room" or lighting).

It takes me about a minute to make all the connections. It will be faster when I get some nail polish to mark the "front" of the connectors for the remote and XLR connectors and some dummy plugs for the inputs that we don't use.

The Snake (one per player)
I have all the cables for each player bound up in a "snake". This includes cables for

  • Remote Control
  • Microphone (s)
  • Instrument (s)
  • This means there's only one "thing" to coil up and store instead of several.



The System Bag (one per system)

The bags is labelled with the name of the player who uses it. It includes:

  • Remote Control unit
  • Power cable and if the player requires it for accessories, a small power bar
  • B1 cable(s)
  • Flashlight (small, the white LED ones work really well)
  • Microphones (actually - I only do this for the drummer's bag because the microphones are really sturdy so I just leave them connected to the microphone cables). The more delicate vocal microphones travel separately in our individual gig bags.


The PowerStands
The PowerStands are labelled with the names of the players who use them. All the settings (presets, gain) are "dialed in" for the player who uses the system. I use 1/2" white "first-aid" tape for labelling things (including the presets, gain settings, phantom power on/off normally used for each system). I'll probably get around to finding caps to block the inputs that aren't used.

Okay - so it takes maybe two-three minutes to find power,

  • Place the PowerStand and B1 for easy access,
  • Plug in B1 cable and power (these hold the access door open although I usually use the 'plug' from the L1 receptacle)
  • Plug in the snake
  • Slide the PowerStand and B1 into final positions
  • L1 goes into the hole (note: this is the last step, and since learning to do it this way, I've spent a lot less time banging my head against it).


After that we just don't need to access anything on the PowerStand. All the real-time, performance adjustments are on the Remote.

Another two-three minutes gets the mic stands placed and microphones and Remotes connected and we're ready to go.

And that's how we do the setup (not including load-in, and assembling the drum kit) in under 5 minutes.
 
Posts: 39036 | Location: Canada (Vancouver) | Registered: Sat June 12 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of holliwil
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quote:
The Snake (one per player)
I have all the cables for each player bound up in a "snake". This includes cables for



Remote Control

Microphone (s)

Instrument (s)

This means there's only one "thing" to coil up and store instead of several.


This is certainly a good idea! I'll be doing some "zip tying".

Jeff
http://www.theunmentionables.com
 
Posts: 1036 | Location: Redding, California | Registered: Mon April 12 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
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Hi Jeff - Another option that I've been using for many years are THESE cable organizers. I tend to tinker constantly, and I'm always fine tuning and changing my set up. I've found it easier to just yank a cable out of the split plastic hose, and replace it with another one when I need to, rather than cut a bunch of plastic ties and then re-do all new ones.
 
Posts: 875 | Registered: Mon October 20 2003Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of holliwil
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Posts: 1036 | Location: Redding, California | Registered: Mon April 12 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of ST
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Those cable organizers are great. Almost impossible to tangle for some reason, and they don't rip your hands (like the zip ties).

They are also very sturdy and add virtually nothing to the weight of your snake.
 
Posts: 39036 | Location: Canada (Vancouver) | Registered: Sat June 12 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of ASAT
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Plastic looms, that's what you're talking about! LOL... Fairly standard bulk electrical item with many good sources including Granger, MMCarr, etc. I've been hosed a few gigs with my own wire-tied snakes so looms are great for spot-repair and re-configuration.
 
Posts: 402 | Location: 3rd rock from the sun | Registered: Tue January 04 2005Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of StevenCee (Saxman7)
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quote:
Originally posted by gittar-jonz:
Hi Jeff - Another option that I've been using for many years are THESE cable organizers. I tend to tinker constantly, and I'm always fine tuning and changing my set up. I've found it easier to just yank a cable out of the split plastic hose, and replace it with another one when I need to, rather than cut a bunch of plastic ties and then re-do all new ones.


From the picture & description, I can't tell how exactly you "yank a cable out", then put another one in, how does that work? And if you need 20ft, will it work if the two seperate tubes aren't connected?


"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace."
- Jimi Hendrix
 
Posts: 250 | Location: Atlanta | Registered: Thu March 18 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of Saxhound
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I've used these "split tubes" at work for network & fiber cables. The tube is split along the entire length, making it easy to slide cables in without removing the end connectors. Because of the springy nature of the tube, once the wire is in, it won't come out unless you want it to. For lengths greater than 10 feet, you have a couple choices. Some industral supply stores sell longer lengths. I think Black Box Networking Products has them in 100 foot rolls. You might also check the W.W. Grainger catalog. You can also line the shorter pieces up carefully, duct tape the ends together, and then cut the tape through the split. Because the duct tape can get sticky in hot weather, this is not always a great solution. I've been thinking about punching 3 or 4 holes in the ends and using small plastic wire ties to hold them together.
 
Posts: 167 | Location: Elmhurst, IL | Registered: Thu March 04 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
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ST,

We just played our first three gigs this weekend with 3L1s/5B1's. I have a posting under "At the Gig and Rehearsal"

We normally average near 45 minutes with our traditional PA (Trailor w/ramp, dollys', etc..) unloading, setting up, sound check. I noticed we were down to 30 minutes, at our last Gig Sunday, but still haven't found our rythum. I noticed most of our time was working with the new soft cases especially the PS1 case.

I've seen postings about the gun cases, skb cases, etc.. just curious how everyone is zipping up so quick.

Todd
 
Posts: 69 | Location: Louisiana | Registered: Thu June 15 2006Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
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For the speaker bags if you put the grill down they go right in. For the base I just stand it on on supporting it on my kneed so that the weight of it pulls it to the bottom and it zips right up.
 
Posts: 591 | Registered: Mon January 16 2006Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of holliwil
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quote:
I noticed most of our time was working with the new soft cases especially the PS1 case.


Todd,
The PS1 cases are very tight, but they will relax over time. Ric's idea is a great way to do it.

The bayonet piece goes into the bag easier if you put the non-bayonet end all the way into the "pouch" end of the bag first, then zip the bag up and over the bayonet.
 
Posts: 1036 | Location: Redding, California | Registered: Mon April 12 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of StevenCee (Saxman7)
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I solved the problem of both the tight fit (why hasn't Bose just made them a bit larger?), and the awkwardness of two separate, & unstable bags, but buying a single (OnStage), heavier duty bag.
I'm not sure which model number I have, but it's either their speaker stand ($20), or lighting truss ($30) bag.

Both pieces slide right in, and can be moved as one, much more stable piece. I had a hell of a time with balancing the two bags on my cart, with all my other equipment.

The "gun cases" solution isn't warranted unless you're going to be doing a lot of flying, or having to pack your pa with tons of other equipment.

My most main gripe about setting up is the sometimes awkward plugging in & setting levels on the base, as you must stoop down to the ground, and also read the pre-sets (& their "cheat sheet") upside down. Why everything is not facing the OTHER direction is something I hope Bose corrects in future versions. I'm sure there is no technical matter preventing it, and with all the controls facing the wall, it just adds a bit more hassle to experience.....


"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace."
- Jimi Hendrix
 
Posts: 250 | Location: Atlanta | Registered: Thu March 18 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of ronjazz
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I never take the big case off, just fold the cover back. I like the idea of one bag for both speaker towers, though.
 
Posts: 247 | Location: Mystic, CT, USA | Registered: Fri October 24 2003Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of Oldghm
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When tearing down, I place the L1 bag over the L1 section before removing it from the bottom section or (in the case of the bottom L1) before removing it from the PS1.

Press the release and with one hand in the bag holding the speaker and the other hand holding the top, lift off and carefully place the top end on the floor and zip the bag closed.

Oldghm
 
Posts: 3111 | Location: Kentucky | Registered: Tue May 25 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of ST
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Hey Oldghm,

If I'm understanding you correctly, your method would prevent getting ceiling spackle embedded in the top cap of the L1™.

You must be taller than you look to come up with that approach. I think I like it.

And hey guys - don't forget the rubber coated gardening gloves during setup/teardown.

edit: spelling

This message has been edited. Last edited by: ST,
 
Posts: 39036 | Location: Canada (Vancouver) | Registered: Sat June 12 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
Picture of troberts
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I found another option for snakes. Picked up a 100ft roll of Flex-o-wrap PET Tubing w/ Velcro
HERE.(Note - requires a hot-knife or soldering iron to cut to length. They also have a new product that is similar and uses scissors for cutting). The velcro allows cable entry or exit at any point in the snake, and with a little effort (opening/closing the velcro) cables can be removed or added. The tubing accomodates multiple cables - the 0.75in size expands up to 1.25in and will hold up to 6 typical diameter mic or instrument cables. Works great!
 
Posts: 315 | Location: Monroe, WA, USA | Registered: Wed January 21 2004Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
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I take about 10 minutes including setting up a pedalboard, music stand, 2 mics etc...

5 minutes for a one mic, one guitar setup without all the other stuff would be easy.
 
Posts: 114 | Registered: Thu May 18 2006Reply With QuoteAsk Bose for help
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